SAKE GLOSSARY

A growing list of definitions for terms found throughout our website and commonly used in the world of sake. At the bottom of the page you will find a form to request definitions to be added to this list.

AIYAMA

A rice variety originating from the Hyōgō Prefecture​.

AKA-MAI-SHU

Red rice sake.

AKITA KOMACHI

Japanese table rice

AKITA SAKE KOMACHI

A rice variety originating from the Akita Prefecture.

AMAMI

The Japanese term for sweetness.​​

AMAKUCHI

The Japanese term for sweet sake.

AMAZAKE

A hot, sweet, rice porridge-like drink made by cooking kōji (non-alcoholic) or kasu (alcoholic) with water. 

 

AMYLOPECTIN

Large, branched type of starch molecule.

AMYLOSE

Small, straight type of starch molecule.

ARABASHIRI

The first portion of the sake to come off the press (free-run juice). Commonly bottled as an unpasteurized spring seasonal release.

ARUKŌRA-TENKA

Addition of distilled alcohol to sake after fermentation (before pressing).

ARUTEN

Sake made with jozo alcohol added.

 

ASSAKU-KI

A machine used to separate sake from the rice solids (lees).

ASUKA

A period in Japanese history from 538 C.E. to 710 C.E.

ATSU-KAN

Hot temperature sake service (50-55°C/120-130°F).

AWA

The Japanese term for foam.

AWAMORI

A Japanese distilled spirit from the Okinawa prefecture.

AZUCHI-MOMOYAMA

A period in Japanese history from 1573 C.E. to 1603 C.E

 
 

BIN-KAN

Sake pasteurized in bottle (also known as bin-hi-ire).

BIN-ZUME

The Japanese term for bottling.

BINZUME-YŌSUI

Water used for warimizu and cleaning bottles and equipment.

BODAI-MOTO

The starter method used prior to the development of Kimoto, developed by monks in the Shoryakuji temple that is high in acidity and very savory.

BREWING YEAR (BY)

The brewing year will be the year of the current Japanese era within the July 1 to June 30 brewing season. The current Japanese era is Heisei, which began in 1989, making 2021 the 32nd brewing year. If a sake is bottle before July 1st, it will have 2020 (or 31BY) on the label. If a sake is bottled after July 1st, it will have 2021 (or 32BY) on the label.

 

CALROSE:

A tropical-adapted, medium-sized grain of japonica rice commonly grown in California.

CHIRORI

A 150-300mL vessel made of copper or pewter for consumption and heating of sake.

CHOYO-NO-SEKKU

A season festival on September 9th with kikuzake (sake steeped with chrysanthemum blossoms).

CHOZŌ

Storage.

CHUNIN

A kurabito with little experience, but more than the genin.

 

DAI-KOSHU

The Japanese term for big old sake.

DAIGINJŌ

Premium sake made with rice polished to 50% or less of the original grain, with the addition of alcohol.

DAKI

A metal, or wooden, vessel that can be filled with cold or hot water to control fermentation temperatures.

DEKŌJI

The seventh step in kōji production.

DEWA NO SATO

A rice variety originating from the Yamagata Prefecture.

DEWA-SANSAN

A rice variety originating from the Yamagata Prefecture.

DOUGUMAWASHI

The kurabito responsible for cleaning and maintaining the brewery tools.

 

DOYO-NO-USHI-NO-HI

A summertime festival with unagizake (sake poured over grilled eel).

DOBUROKU

Unpressed sake.

 

ECHIGŌ TŌJI

A tōji guild originating from Niigata Prefecture.

EDO

A period in Japanese history from 1602 to 1868, Tōkyō was known as Edo during this period.

 

FUDOKI

An ancient Japanese record of culture and geography from the 700s.

FUKURO

Cotton bags used for traditional sake pressing.

FUKURYŪSUI

Prized spring water from Mt. Fuji.

FUKURO-SHIBORI

The traditional and time consuming form of pressing by use of gravity (drip method).

FUNA-SHIBORI

Sake pressed by a traditional fune press.

FUNE

A traditional sake press.

FUTA

A small tray used during kōji making.

FUTA-KŌJI

Tray kōji.

FUTSŪ-SHU

Basic, non-premium sake ("table sake").

 

GAIKŌNAINAN

The optimal condition of steamed rice, firm on the outside and tender on the inside.

GELATINIZATION

The process of changing the structure of sugar molecules in the starchy center of the rice grain.

GENIN

The most rookie kurabito.

 

GENMAI

Unpolished rice.

GENMAISHU

Sake produced with unpolished rice.

GENSHU

Undiluted sake ("cask strength").

GINFUBUKI

A rice variety originating from the Shiga Prefecture.

GINGINGA

A rice variety originating from the Iwate Prefecture.

GINJŌ

Premium sake made with rice polished to 60% or less of the original grain, with the addition of alcohol.

GINJŌ-KA

Ginjō aromas

(aniseed, apple, banana, blossom, bubblegum, cherry, lily, lychee, melon, pear, pineapple, rose, strawberry).

GINNOSEI

A rice variety originating from the Akita Prefecture​.

GINOTOME

A rice variety originating from the Iwate Prefecture.

GINPU

A rice variety originating from the Hokkaidō Prefecture

 GŌ

A sake measurement equivalent to 180mL (standard service size).

GOKOSUI

"Perfumed Water" - prized soft water from Fushimi in Kyōto, Japan used for sake production.

GŌSEISEISHU

A synthetic sake.

GOHYAKUMAN-GOKU

A rice variety originating from the Niigata Prefecture.

GUINOMI

A traditional cup used for consuming sake (large).

 

HAENUKI

Japanese table rice​​

HAKO

A medium tray used during kōji making.

HAKO-KŌJI

Box kōji.

HAKUMAI

White rice.

HAKUTSURU NISHIKI

A rice variety originating from the Hyōgō Prefecture.

HANAFUBUKI:

A rice variety originating from the Aomori Prefecture

HANA-HIE

"Flower" sake service temperature range (5-10°C/40-50°F).

HANMAI

Table rice.

HAPP-OSHU

Sparkling sake. Also known as happō-sei-shu.

HATSU-ZOE

The first of three additions to the fermentation batch.

HATTAN-NISHIKI

A rice variety originating from the Hiroshima Prefecture.

HEIAN

A period in Japanese history from 794 C.E. to 1185 C.E.

HEIKOU FUKUHAKKOU

The conversion of starch into sugar by kōji enzymes and the conversion of sugar into alcohol by yeast at the same time, in the same tank. This process is unique to sake production. Also known as multiple parallel fermentation.

HEISEI

The current period in Japanese starting in 1989.

HIDAHOMARE

A rice variety originating from the Gifu Prefecture.

HI-IRE

Pasteurization.

HIKIKOMI

The first step in kōji production.

HINATA-KAN

"Sun warmed" sake service temperature range (30-35°C/85-95°F).

HINE-KA

"Out of Condition" resulting from a sake that has been improperly stored or aged too long resulting in aromas of caramel, toffee, pickled or rotten vegetables.

HINOKI

Japanese cypress tree.

HI-OCHI-KIN

A lactic acid bacteria that spoils unpasteurized sake.

HIREZAKE

Hot sake served with a grilled fugu fin.

HIROSHIMA-HATTAN

A rice variety originating from the Hiroshima Prefecture.

HITOGOKOCHI

A rice variety originating from the Nagano Prefecture.

 

HITOHADA-KAN

"Body temperature" sake service temperature range (35-40°C/95-105°F).

HITOMEBORE

Japanese table rice​.

HIYA OROSHI

Sake that is pasteurized in bulk after filtration (before storage), but not before bottling. Also known as "fresh-bottled sake" and released as an autumn seasonal product.

HIZO-SHU

"Treasured sake" - A sake aged for over five years at the brewery.

HONJŌZŌ

Premium sake made with rice polished to 70% or less of the original grain, with the addition of alcohol.

HYŌGŌ KITA NISHIKI

A rice variety originating from the Hyōgō Prefecture​.

HYŌGŌ YUME NISHIKI

A rice variety originating from the Hyōgō Prefecture​.

 

ISSHŌBIN

1.8L bottle.

IWA-AWA

5-6 days after tome-zoe when "rock-like" foam begins to appear.

IWAI

A rice variety originating from the Kyōtō Prefecture​.

IZAKAYA

A Japanese sake bar.

IZUMO TŌJI

A tōji guild originating from Shimane Prefecture.

 

 

J.A.

Japan Agriculture: farming cooperatives (also known as nōkyō).

JA-KAN

Bulk pasteurization.

JI

Roughly 21 days after tome-zoe when the bubbles dissipate.

JIZAKE

Sake produced by a small brewer with local ingredients.

JO-ON

"Room temperature" sake service temperature range (15-30°C/60-85°F).

JŌMON

A period in Japanese history from 10,000 to 900 B.C.E.

JŌSŌ

Pressing.

JOUNIN

A kurabito with little experience, but more than the chunin.

 

JŌZŌ ARUKŌRU

Distilled alcohol produced from any agricultural product used in all non-Junmai sake production.

JŌZŌ-YŌSUI

Water, with a proper mineral content, used for sake production.

JUKU-SEI-SHU 

Sake aged outside of the brewery.

JUKUSHU

A Japanese tasting term for a sake that is aromatic and powerful.

JUNMAI

"Pure", premium sake produced with only rice, water, kōji, and yeast. No additions or jōzō alcohol allowed. No minimum polishing percentage.

JUNMAI DAIGINJŌ

Premium sake made with rice polished to 50% or less of the original grain, without the addition of alcohol.

 

JUNMAI GINJŌ

Premium sake made with rice polished to 60% or less of the original grain, without the addition of alcohol.

JUNSHU

A Japanese tasting term for a sake that has subdued aromatics, and is rich and powerful.

JYOH-KAN

"Warm" sake service temperature range (45-50°C/113-120°F).

 

KAI-IRE

Stirring of the fermentation vat.

KAKE-MAI

Steamed rice used for sake production.

KAMAKURA

A period in Japanese history from 1185 C.E. to 1333 C.E.

KAMAYA

The kurabito responsible for steaming the rice.

 

KAME-NO-O

An heirloom Japanese table rice​​​.

KAN-DOUKO

A water bath used to heat a tokkuri.

KANJI

Japanese writing symbols.

KANPAI

Cheers!

KAN-DOUKO

An automated machine used to heat sake.

KAN NO MAI

A rice variety originating from the Shimane Prefecture

KAN-ZAKE

Heated sake.

KARAKUCHI

The Japanese term for dry sake.

KARASHI

A resting period.

KASHIRA

The kurabito second to the tōji, responsible for the moromi.

 

KASSEISHU

A traditional style of sparkling sake that is coarsely filtered, bottled unpasteurized, and released as a winter seasonal product.

KASU

The rice solids remaining after the sake has been pressed.

KASU-BUAI

The percentage of remaining solids in relation to the total amount of polished rice used for the batch.

KATAHAKU

"Single white" - a sake that is produced with brown rice for the kōji and white rice for the steamed rice.

KI-IPPON

A Junmai sake produced and bottled in the same kura (estate).

KIJŌ-SHU

A sweet sake made by adding sake to the mash in place of some water.

 

KI-KŌJI

Yellow kōji, Aspergillus oryzae, traditional kōji used in sake making.

KIKI-CHOKO

The traditional 180mL white porcelain semi-official tasting cup with blue circles inside the base.

KIKIZAKE

Sake tasting.

KIKUZAKE

Sake steeped with chrysanthemum blossoms consumed on September 9th for Choyo-no-sekku.

KIMOTO

A method of preparing the starter that dates back to the 1600s. Natural lactic bacteria and mixing with poles are employed in this 30 day process resulting in a gamey style of sake.

KINMAZE

Japanese table rice​​​​

 

KINUHIKARI

Japanese table rice​​​​

KIRARA 397

Japanese table rice​​​​

KIRE

A Japanese term describing a sake with a short, clean, crisp finish.

KIRIKAESHI

The third step of kōji production.

KŌBO

The Japanese term for yeast.

KOFUN

A period in Japanese history from 300 C.E. to 538 C.E.

KŌJI

Rice that has been inoculated with kōji-kin. Also known as kome-kōji

KŌJI-BUAI

A percentage determined by the amount of kōji used divided by the total amount of rice used.

KŌJI-KIN

The mold used to convert starch to sugar in sakemai (aspergillus oryzae).

KŌJI MURO

The room in a which the kōji is made.

KOKOSHU

The Japanese term for very old sake.

KOKU

A sake measurement equivalent to 180L.

KŌ-ŌN TŌKA MOTO

A high temperature quicker fermentation method.

KOSHIKI

A traditional rice steaming vat.

KOSHIHIKARI

Japanese table rice​​​

KOSHI TANREI

A rice variety originating from the Niigata Prefecture

KOSHU

Aged sake.

KŌSUI

Hard water.

KUCHIKAMIZAKE

The most traditional method of sake production known as "mouth chewed sake".

KUNSHU

A Japanese tasting term for a sake that is aromatic and light.

KURA

A sake brewery, also known as shuzō.

KURA NO HANA

A rice variety originating from the Miyagi Prefecture

KURABITO

Sake brewery workers.

KURAMOTO

A sake brewery owner.

KURO-KŌJI

Black kōji, Aspergillus awamori, traditional kōji used in the production of Awamori.

KYŌKAI KŌBO

Yeasts distributed by the Brewing Society of Japan, also known as association yeasts.

KYŪBETSU-SEIDO

A sake grading system established in 1943, based on tax rates for every 180 liters of sake sold. The higher the grade, the higher the tax rate. This system was abolished in 1992.

LIMIT DEXTRINS

Branched chains of sugar molecules unbroken by enzymes that remain in the final product and give sake its unique mouthfeel. 

 

MABOROSHI-NO-SAKE

"Phantom sake", a name some breweries give to their most exclusive sake.

MASU

A small wooden box traditionally used for measuring rice and now used for sake service (180mL).

 

MEIJI

A period in Japanese history from 1868 C.E. to 1912 C.E.

MEISUI

Japanese for "famous water".

MESHITAKI

The kurabito, known as the cook, often a woman, who is responsible for preparing food for the other kurabito.

MIRIN

Sweet cooking sake.

MIYAMA-NISHIKI

A rice variety originating from the Nagano Prefecture.

MIYAMIZU

"Miracle Water" - prized hard water from Nada, in Hyōgō, Japan used for sake production.

 

MIZORE-ZAKE

"Sleet" sake service temperature (-5°C/20°F).

MIZU

Japanese for water.

MIZU-AWA

3-4 days after tome-zoe when "froth-like" foam begins to appear.

MIZU-MOTO

Another term for Bodai-moto.

 

MOMO-NO-SEKKU

A seasonal festival on March 3rd with amazake or tokashu.

MORI

The fourth step in kōji production.

 

MOROHAKU

"Double white" - a sake that is produced with white rice for the kōji and steamed rice.

MOROMI

The main fermentation mash.

 

MOTO

Another term for the fermentation starter.

 

MOTO-KŌJI

The first addition of kōji.

MOTOMAWASHI

The kurabito responsible for the moto.

 

MULTIPLE PARALLEL FERMENTATION

The conversion of starch into sugar by kōji enzymes and the conversion of sugar into alcohol by yeast at the same time, in the same tank. This process is unique to sake production.

MUROKA

Sake that has not gone through carbon filtration.

 

MUROMACHI

A period in Japanese history from 1336 C.E. to 1573 C.E.

MUSHIMAI

The Japanese term for steaming rice.

MUSHIRO

Mats that wrap around the tank for temperature control during fermentation.

 

NAKA-DORI

The middle part (heart) of the sake coming off of the press (also known as naka-gumi).

 

NAKA-GUMI

The middle part (heart) of the sake coming off of the press (also known as naka-dori).

NAKA-KŌJI:

The third addition of kōji.

NAKA-SHIGOTO

The fifth step of kōji production.

 

NAKA-ZOE

The second of three additions to the fermentation batch.

 

NAKATE-SHINSENBON

Japanese table rice​​​​

NAMA

Unpasteurized sake.

 

NAMA-CHOZŌ

Sake that is not pasteurized after filtration (before storage), however is pasteurized in bulk before bottling. Also known as "fresh-stored sake".

 

NAMA-HINE-KA:

An out of condition unpasteurized sake due to lack of refrigeration resulting in aromas of malt and cured meat.

 

NAMA-ZAKE

Unpasteurized sake.

 

NAMA-ZUME

Sake that is pasteurized in bulk after filtration (before storage), but not before bottling. Also known as "fresh-bottled sake".

 

NANBU TŌJI

A tōji guild originating from Iwate Prefecture.

 

NANSUI

Soft water.

 

NARA

A period in Japanese history from 710 C.E. to 794 C.E.

NIGAMI

The Japanese term for bitterness.

 

NIGORI

Roughly filtered or "cloudy" sake.

 

NIHONBARE

Japanese table rice​​​​

NIHON-SHU

A legal Japanese term for sake.

 

NIHONSHU-DO

A number that indicates the sweetness of dryness of a sake, the higher, the dryer (see SMV).

 

NOJUN

A Japanese tasting term indicating the sake is rich, complex, and graceful.

 

NŌKYŌ

Japan Agriculture (JA): farming cooperatives.

 

NOTO TŌJI

A tōji guild originating from Ishikawa Prefecture.

 

NUKA

Rice particles created during polishing.

 

NURU-KAN

"Lukewarm" sake service temperature range (40-45°C/105-113°F).

 

NURU-HAZE

Uneven mold growth during kōji production.

 

NYŪSAN

Lactic acid.

 
 

O-CHOKO

A traditional cup used for consuming sake (small).

OCHI-AWA

Roughly 12 days after tome-zoe when the foam starts to "fall".

ODORI

"Dance"- The second day of sandan jikomi when nothing is added.

OIMIZU

The addition of water during fermentation.

O-KAN

Heated sake service.

OKE

Sake fermentation and/or storage tank.

OMACHI

An heirloom rice variety originating from the Okayama Prefecture.

OMIKI

Sacred sake.

ORI

Solids from fresh pressed sake that settle to the bottom of the tank.

ORIBIKI

The settling of sake after fermentation to allow the solids to settle.

ORIZAKE

Another name for nigori sake (cloudy sake) 

OSETO

Japanese table rice​​​​

 

REISHU

Chilled sake service.

RENZOKU JŌMAI-KI

A modern continuous rice steaming machine.

ROKA

Filtration.

 

SAKA NISHIKI

A rice variety originating from the Shimane Prefecture.

SAKAGURA

Another term for a sake producer (kura) 

SAKAZUKI

A ceremonial cup used for sake consumption.

SAKE

An alcoholic beverage made from rice

SAKE ZUKURI UTA

Traditional songs sung while working in the kura.

SAKEMAI

Rice used for sake production (also known as shuzō kōteki mai).

 

SAKE METER VALUE (SMV)

A number that indicates the sweetness of dryness of a sake, the higher, the dryer.

 

SAKURA

The Japanese term for cherry blossoms.​

SANDAN JIKOMI

The three stage addition process used in sake making.

SEI-HAKUMAI

Polished white rice.

SEIKIKU

The production of kōji.

SEIMAI BUAI

A percentage indicating the amount of the original rice grain remaining after polishing.

 

SEIMAIKI

A rice milling machine.

 

SEISHU

A legal Japanese term for sake.

 

SEME

The final fraction during the pressing of sake.

 

SENBIN-YŌSUI

Water used for cleaning of bottles.

 

SENBON-NISHIKI

A rice variety originating from the Hiroshima Prefecture.

SENMAI

The Japanese term for washing rice.

 

SENMAI-YŌSUI

Water used for the washing of rice.

SHAKU

A sake measurement equivalent to 18mL.

 

SHIBORI

Pressing sake.

 

SHIBORITATE

Just pressed sake.

 

SHIBUMI

The Japanese term for astringency.

 

SHIKOMI-YŌSUI

Water used during fermentation.

 

SHIMAI-SHIGOTO

The sixth step of kōji production.

 

SHINPAKU

The heart of the rice grain containing the starch.

 

SHINRIKI

An heirloom rice variety with an unknown origination.

SHINSEKI

The Japanese term for soaking the rice.

 

SHINSEKI-YŌSUI

Water used for the soaking of rice.

 

SHINSHU

New Sake (the opposite of koshu).

SHIRINPIN

A Japanese tasting term indicating a pleasantly powerful and persistent finish.

 

SHIZUKU-ZAKE

Sake made by the traditional gravity or drip method of pressing.

 

SHŌ

A sake measurement equivalent to 1.8L.

SHOBUZAKE

Sake flavored with iris root flavored consumed on May 5th for Tango-no-sekku

SHŌCHŪ

A Japanese distilled spirit.

SHORYAKUJI TEMPLE

A Buddhist temple in Nara built in 992 and the modern birthplace of sake. 

SHŌWA

A period in Japanese history from 1926 C.E. to 1989 C.E.

SHUBO

Another term for the fermentation starter.

 

SHIRO-KŌJI

White kōji, Aspergillus kawachi, traditional kōji used in the production of shōchū.

SHUZŌ

Another term for a brewery.

 

SHUZŌ KŌTEKI MAI

Sake specific rice (also known as sakemai).

 

SHUZŌ-YŌSUI

The Japanese term for water used for the production of sake, divided into two categories: binzume-yōsui & jōzō-yōsui. 

SŌ-HAZE

A way of making kōji in which the mold covers the rice in a thick layer (full flavor).

 

SOBUSHU

Monks' sake.

SOKUJŌ MOTO

A modern yeast starter, created in 1911, in which lactic acid is added, creating a quicker fermentation, roughly two weeks. This is the industry standard as it results in a cleaner style of sake. 

 

SOSHU

A Japanese tasting term for a sake that is simple and easy to drink.

SUGI

Japanese cedar.

 

SUGIDAMA

A ball of Japanese cedar (sugi) hung over the entrance to a brewery at the start of the brewing season.

SUJI-AWA

2-3 days after tome-zoe when "string-like" foam begins to appear.

SUROKA

Sake filtered by material other than carbon.

SUZU-HIE

"Snow" sake service temperature range (10-15°C/50-60°F).

TAISHI

The kurabito responsible for the kōji.

 

TAISHŌ

A period in Japanese history from 1912 C.E. to 1926 C.E.

TAJIMA TŌJI

A tōji guild originating from Hyōgō Prefecture.

TAKA-AWA

7-10 days after tome-zoe when "high foam" begins to appear.

TAMA-AWA

Roughly 14 days after tome-zoe when the foam turns into "bubbles".

TAMASAKAE

A rice variety originating from the Shiga Prefecture.

TANBA TŌJI

A tōji guild originating from Hyōgō Prefecture.

 

TANE-KIRI

Kōji mold seeds used to inoculate rice when creating kōji.

TANGO-NO-SEKKU

A seasonal festival on May 5th in which sake flavored with iris root, shobuzake, is consumed

TANREI-KARAKUCHI

A style of dry sake known to be light and pure with a kire finish promoted by Echigo Tojis.

 

TARUZAKE

Sake aged in Japanese cedar (taru) barrels.

TANSO-ROKA

Carbon filtration.

TENUGUI

Lint free cotton cloth used during kōji production.

 

TŌ

A sake measurement equivalent to 18L.

 

TOBIKIRI-KAN

"Extreme" sake service temperature range (55+°C/130+°F).

TŌBIN

18L bottle.

 

TŌBIN-GAKOI

The middle pressing of sake separated into 18L bottles, often used for premium or contest sake.

 

TŌJI

The head brewer.

TOKASHU

Peach-flavored sake.

 

TOKO-MOMI

The second step of kōji production.

TOKKURI

A carafe used for sake service.

 

TOKO

A large shallow bed used during kōji making.

 

TOKO-KŌJI

Bed kōji.

 

TOKU

"Special" - The second grade of sake-specific rice.

 

TOKU-JŌ

"Above Special" - The first grade of sake-specific rice.

 

TOKUBETSU

"Something special" - A designation for Honjozo or Junmai sake that typically indicating a lower milling percentage than required or a special sake rice has been used.

 

TŌKUTEI MEISHŌSHU

Special designation sake (Junmai, Honjozo, Junmai/Ginjō, and Junmai/Daiginjō).

 

TOME-KŌJI

This fourth addition of kōji.

TOME-ZOE

The third of three additions to the fermentation batch.

TOSHIZAKE

An herb and spiced sake consumed for the New Year.

 

TSUKI-HAZE

A way of making kōji in which the mold grows deeply into the center of the rice grain (delicate flavor).

 
 

UMAMI

A flavor component indicated savoriness.

UNAGIZAKE

Sake poured over grilled eel.

 

WARIMIZU

The addition of water after filtration to lower the alcohol by volume.

WATARIBUNE

An heirloom rice variety thought to be an adaptation of Omachi in the Shiga Prefecture.

 

YABUTA

A brand name of an assaku-ki sake press.

 

YABUTA-SHIBORI

Sake pressed with the assaku-ki sake press.

 

YAMADA-NISHIKI

A rice variety originating from the Hyōgō Prefecture.

YAMADAHO

A rice variety with an unknown origination

YAMAHAI

A method of preparing the starter that dates back to the 1899. A simplified version of kimoto that utilizes natural lactic bacteria but eliminates the mixing with poles, resulting in a gamey style of sake.

 

YAMA-OROSHI

Rice grinding with poles (used during the kimoto method).

 

YAMA-OROSHI HAISHI

The ceasing of rice grinding with poles (used during the yamahai method).

 

YAYOI

A period in Japanese history from 900 B.C.E. to 300 C.E.

YONDAN

The optional fourth addition that controls the sweetness level for non-junmai sakes.

YONGŌBIN

720mL bottle.

YUKI-HIE

"Snow" sake service temperature range (0-5°C/30-40°F).

YUKIMIZAKE

Sake poured over snowflakes and consumed whilst the snow falls.

YUME NO KAORI

A rice variety originating from the Fukushima Prefecture

 

ZATSUMI

A Japanese term used to describe an unbalanced sake.

 

ZATSUYO-YŌSUI

Water used for cleaning equipment.

 

ZENKOKU SHINSHU KANPYŌKAI

"New National Sake Contest" a sake tasting competition held every spring.

 

ZENKŌJI

A sweet sake made with 100% kōji rather than the usual 15-25%.

ZOE-KŌJI

This fourth addition of  kōji.

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